The Potential Risks of Avoiding Change

I’ve been preaching about the benefits of accepting change for the past two weeks and this week I decided to write about the risk because I’m curious to see what comes up for me. If you’re new to my page you’ll quickly learn that often times all I have is a title, once I start writing then the blog post evolves. In other words, I have no idea (at this point in the post) what the details of this blog will be about. I think risks has many layers because all of life’s circumstances are different. For example, the risk of hurting ourselves or losing our lives is not the same as taking a chance or making a bad decision. We have all fallen into one of those risk categories and although it may have been frigthening (life changing in fact), sometimes taking risks is how we truly embrace life and living and not just exist.

The risk of avoiding change is not at the higher end of the risk spectrum and I have mentioned in my previous post that sometime change is inevitable. Meaning we can’t always avoid it but choosing to avoid change because of fear or because you like things to stay the same is an ingredient of stagnation. We change to grow, we change to learn, we change to stay mentally active, and we change to experience life. These reasons alone are enough to endure the risk of accepting and embracing change. So what are some potential risks of avoiding change?

SUPPRESSING INTERNAL GROWTH I am not a therapist nor do I work as a mental health professional so this is my unprofessional opinion. I think making a conscious effort to avoid change is some what similar (not the same) but somewhat similar to a form of social anxiety disorder. People who suffer from this disorder usually experience anxiety when they are in social situations and they may experience symptoms of fear, worry, avoidance, etc. Again, I am no professional so I don’t want to go any further with the details but my comparison is, people who avoid change may exhibit similar symptoms and will likely avoid change at all cost. I think this supresses something inside of us that could potentially interfere with our growth because I don’t think as human beings we were meant to avoid change at all cost.

BEING LEFT BEHIND This could apply to many areas of our lives but this is especially true when you’re tasked with learning new ideas, things, lessons, products, technology, etc. especially in settings like the workplace or if you’re an instructor. Imagine what it would be like for the students and the educator if they refused to stay updated on new theories and lessons in their field. Similarly, when we don’t stay up to date in changes in our work environment by attending conferences or trainings we can be left behind. Especially if you work in IT. Change keeps us from being outdated.

THE EFFECTS IN OTHER AREAS OF YOUR LIFE If you’re resistant to change it will probably affect your approach in other areas of your life. I feel like if don’t exercise one area of what it means to be human, something else falls short. Because I think everything that makes us human is meant to function as a whole in order for us to be fully affective. When things aren’t working the way it should, we see someone (doctors, therapists, life coaches, physical therapists, etc.).

The list of potential risk surpasses what I’ve presented but I really like presenting these tips in threes. I want to make it clear that I’m aware that not everything is easy for everyone. I know there are some people who are resistant to change because of anxiety and other underlying factors. Being receptive to change if you fall in this category will take time, practice, and possibly some outside help or coaching. I’m sure there are even some tools available online. My encouraging words for those who fall in this category is; take your time and go at your own pace. There’s strength in trying even if you don’t achieve.

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Published by tam33ks

I have a long history with mental illness. Overcoming depression made me realize my own resilience. It also made it clear that I wasn’t taking care of myself. I believe that in order for us to fully engage with ourselves and others we have to make time for self-love through our self-care habits. My goal with this blog is to encourage women in my age group to make time for self-care daily.

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